Paint a graffiti wall

News | Blog

Graffiti Blog 1

Young people can find their inner street artist, reflect on programme ideas and come up with new ones during this Youth Shaped activity.

This activity contributes to the following badges:

Scout Creative Challenge Award

Time: 60 minutes

Equipment:

  • Spray paint
  • Masks (such as dust masks)
  • Goggles
  • Wood or cardboard slabs, to use as a canvas
  • Protective covering for the floor
  • Old clothing, to be worn

Instructions

1) Before you start, check if anyone in your section has asthma or any other allergies that may be affected by using spray paint. They might still be able to take part. The activity must take place in a well-ventilated area, preferably outside. Ensure safety instructions are followed, and have a quick conversation with everyone about the laws surrounding graffiti.

2) Have a discussion around types of urban art and graffiti. You could print some images ahead of time to help spark ideas.

3) With the protective covering, masks and goggles in place, encourage your young people to spray paint any ideas they have onto the wood/cardboard. Encourage them to use their imaginations – there are no ‘wrong’ ideas.

4) Use the finished masterpiece to inspire your next planning session. Display it in your meeting place to refer back to throughout the term.

Three types of graffiti to try:

Stencil

Uses a stencil made of cardboard or another material. This is less freestyle than just spray-painting, for example, but still allows for artistic expression. The image at the top of the article represents stenciling.

Papercut

Created by drawing large images onto paper and then pasting them onto outside walls using paste, and covering it in paste as well, to protect it.

 

Graffiti Blog 2

 

Reverse negative

Instead of cutting out the design for a stencil, with this method you cut out all the space around the design, so that the design is left blank but the area around it gets painted.

 

Graffiti Blog 3

 

Youth Shaped Scouting

Over the last four years, there has been a growing momentum to ensure young people are shaping their experiences and taking on peer leadership roles at Scouts. For more information about Youth Shaped Scouting visit: scouts.org.uk/youshape.

Back to articles list

Most read